Thème : Production de fer
Index thématique -> Économie -> Transformation -> Production de fer
1 No d'identification : 24061 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) Aux forges du Saint-Maurice en 1808, l'observateur note
que les travailleurs (citation) "make about 1000 stoves per
annum; the small single stoves sell for 3 L. and the larger sort
for 6 L. each. The double stoves, which have an oven at the top,
are sold for 10 or 12 L. according to the size. Potash kettles
sell from 20 to 25 L. each".
(Citation) "Fresh veins of ore are daily discovered, land
purchased at a trifling price of the people in whose land it is
found. Messrs. Munro and Bell had incurred great expense in
collecting ore and improving the works at the expiration of their
lease in 1806, and would have given 1 200 L. per annum, it is
said, rather than it should hâve gone into other hands.
(Résume) La même année, soit en 1808 l'observateur note que
(citation): "The present proprietors of the works, at the
commencement of their taking them, in order to push the sale of
their bar iron, which was at that time inconsiderable, purchased
a large stock of very inferior British iron, and knowing that the
Habitants regarded the price more than the quality, they sold it
to them for a trifle less than the Three-Rivers iron (. .)".

Référence
John Lambert, Travels through Canada, s.l., s.n., 1813 : 487-488.

2 No d'identification : 24065 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) En 1737, la Compagnie des forges essaie d'implanter des
forges, probablement près de Trois-Rivières.* (Citation) "La compagnie des
forges, involved construction of a blast-furnace which apparently
was finally successful in producing iron. Nevertheless, the
entreprise failed after a short time owing to lack of capital.
The works were taken over by the crown in 1743 and, with the
injection of sufficient funds, flourished. This earliest Canadian
iron works was destined to be long-lived. Known as the St-Maurice
Iron Works (from the name of a nearby river), the works
produced iron for the next 140 years".
(Résumé) L'auteur mentionne qu'en 1733, une première tentative
pour fabriquer du fer s'était soldée par un échec: (citation)
"Even when in 1733 a furnace was finally constructed which was
convenient to the extensive ore deposits near Trois-Rivières, the
attempt at ironmaking in Canada was unsuccessful".
* Commentaire: II s'agit des Forges du Saint-Maurice.

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : xii.

3 No d'identification : 24067 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) Au début du 18e siècle, la Saint-Maurice Iron Works innove
en utilisant un nouveau procèdé...(citation) "the operation of
this simple furnace was made independent of the wind by using
bellows. At first. they were manually operated, but were later
fowered by waterwheels. The result was the same: sponge iron to
shaped by hammering. This primitive process was used on
several occasions in Canada, the first being in the early
eighteenth century at the St Maurice Iron Works, where, in addition to the
blast-furnace that produced molten iron for casting, a small
furnace was operated to smelt ore directly into sponge iron.
Because of its toughness, the iron so obtained was particularly
suitable for axe heads. At one tinte, the St Maurice smiths turned
out 120 of them each day".

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 2.

4 No d'identification : 24068 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) La St Maurice Works a produit du fer en grande quantité,
(citation) "Records of the production for 1746, for example, showed
that the amount made in that year exceeded L 1,000,000. The
seiling price, expressed in the monetary terras of New France, was
twenty-five to thirty beaver skins per 100 pounds. In some years, as many as
200 stoves were manufactured, along with great quantities of pots
and other cast ware. The same works also produced bar iron".

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 5.

5 No d'identification : 24073 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Citation) "Established in 1860 about ten miles from
Trois-Rivieres, [the Radnor Works used] ore mined by local farmers.
In a later development, however, ore for the works was dredged
from Lac Tortue. Although wrought iron was produced at the Radnor works, where it was rolled into nail rods and bars from which
scythes were made, the main application of the iron from its
furnace was the manufacture of iron wheels for railway cars, cast
in a shop set up in Trois-Rivieres especially for their
production".

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 13.

6 No d'identification : 24078 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) A part le "Walloon process"... (citation) "Another
method of converting cast pigs into wrought iron vas also used in
Canada. Patented in 1784 by the Englishman, Henry Cort, it was
known as the "puddling" process." [...] "The puddling process was
sed in many Canadian works. The five furnaces of the Acadia Iron
works produced iron of sufficiently high quality that some bars
were shipped to Sheffield, England. At the same works, the iron
loups obtained from the puddle forges were formed into bar iron
and blooms under a massive hammer, 2500 pounds in weight, raised
by steam power. It was much larger than the hammers of earlier
works, which were raised by water power. The St Maurice Works,
for example, had two 500 Ib water-powered hammers".


Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 3-4.

7 No d'identification : 24080 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Citation) "During the twenty years following the opening of the
Radnor Works, at least seven other ironmaking ventures were
undertaken in Québec". (Résumé) En 1867 et 1868
(approximativement), les forges de la rivière Moisie ont produit du [mot illisible]. À Hull en 1872, une forge fut ouverte mais elle a du fermer
après. (Citation) "A charcoal-fuelied blast-furnace had also
been erected near Hull in 1867. [...] A forest fire, however, made the
operation short-lived. Another charcoal furnace in Québec was
that in Yamaska County which operated between 1869 and 1880, when
local ores were exhausted". (Résumé) Entre 1873 et 1880,
(citation) "Two blast-furnaces erected at Baie St Paul also had
relatively short lives (...) The last two traditional furnaces
built in Québec were constructed at Drummondville in 1880 and
remained in opération for about twenty years".

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 14.

8 No d'identification : 24082 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Citation) "An unusual method of reducing iron ore, attempted in
Montréal in 1881, involved what was called the "blowpipe
process". [...] The revolution of the blowpipe caused the iron to
be formed into small balls which were collected and hammered into
looms. Although some iron was produced in Canada by this method,
it was not enought to make the process a commercial success".

Référence
Eric Arthur et Thomas Ritchie, Iron: Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Présent, Toronto, Buffalo, London, University of Toronto Press, 1982 : 3.

9 No d'identification : 24086 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) Le haut fourneau des Forges du Saint-Maurice (citation)
"est chargé quarante-cinq fois dans vingt-quatre heures et
perce a des intervalles qui varient de douze a dix-huit heures. On
y fabrique journellement quatre tonnes de fonte dont dix pour cent de fonte blanche et dix pour cent de fonte truitee". [...]
- Le minerai donnait de 33 a 35 pour cent de fer, et coûtait, à
l'usine, $2.50 la tonne et quelques fois plus". (...) "Outre la
fonte, on fabriquait encore ici une faible quantité de fer forgé,
par le procède antique de l'affinage au foyer".

Référence
R.W. Ells, Rapport sur les richesses minérales de la Province de Québec, s.l., s.n., 1890 : 24.

10 No d'identification : 24094 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Résumé) Dans le rapport de la Commission de Géologie date de
1873-74, le docteur Harrington décrit le limonite québécois de la
façon suivante: (citation) "les limonites de la province de
Québec appartiennent presque toutes à des formations récentes,
et elles se présentent ordinairement près de la surface dans des
terrains sablonneux, et proviennent fréquemment de sables
ferrugineux. La variété traitée jusqu'aujourd'hui, tantôt à l'état de
concrétions, tantôt à l'état massif, offre souvent une curieuse
structure caverneuse; elle est parfois terne et terreuse, mais
présente quelquefois une cassure hautement luisante", (p.29)
(Citation) "Cette limonite se réduit facilement, et, à en juger
par les résultats obtenus par M. M. McDougall, donne, quand elle
est convenablement traitée, un fer de valeur uniforme", (p.29)

Référence
R.W. Ells, Rapport sur les richesses minérales de la Province de Québec, s.l., s.n., 1890 : 29.

11 No d'identification : 24758 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Intégral)
"Drummond, McCall and Company.
Iron Steel and General Merchants.
Office: New York Life Building, Montréal, Qué.”

Référence
The Canadian Mining Manual and Companies Directory (1894) : XXVIII.

12 No d'identification : 24800 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Intégral) "In the winter of 1872-73 the Haycock iron mine,
located about eight miles north-east of the city of Ottawa, in
the Province of Quebec, vas opened and about 5,000 tons of ore
raised. The works consisted of a steam saw mill, bloomary forge,
engines, pumps, steam hammer. Blooms were made and exported to
England; the iron vas of a very fine quality. but the entreprise
was not commercially successful and the works were closed."

Référence
The Canadian Mining Iron and Steel Manual (1896) : 299.

13 No d'identification : 24866 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Intégral) "En 1854, Mgr Cooke fit une visite à St-Maurice pour
bénir les hauts fourneaux construits par MM. Turcotte, Hall et
Larue, sur la rivière au Lard, dans le rang Ste-Marguerite".
[300] "C'est ici que, pendant bien des années, on coula toutes
les roues du Grand Tronc. Elles étaient tellement bonnes que l'on
exhiba à Londres une roue qui était encore intacte, après avoir
fait deux fois le tour du monde, en comptant ses voyages de
Portland à Québec, et de Québec à Montréal.
La compagnie Turcotte, Hall et Larue voulut faire compétition à
la Suède pour le fer battu. Pour atteindre ce but, on construisit
des machines immenses appelées par nos gens: "Rolling Mills".
Cette fabrication ne donna pas les résultats attendus, le fer
n'était pas assez épuré par les laminoirs. La compagnie perdit,
dans cette entreprise, la somme de $85,000 et discrédita le fer
Radnor". [301] Cette industrie donna beaucoup de valeur à nos
terres et fit la fortune de plusieurs habitants, car les dépenses
annuelles s'élevaient quelquefois jusqu'à $100,000."

Référence
Jean (pseud.) Bart et J.O. Prince, «Historique de la paroisse de Saint-Maurice, Comte de Champlain», BRH, vol. 35, no. 5 (mai 1929) : 300 et 302.

14 No d'identification : 24952 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Intégral - partiel) "Dès 1854 s'était fondée sur le
Saint-Maurice l'entreprise des Forges de Radnor, à deux milles au
Nord du village» dans le rang Sainte-Marguerite, sur un
affleurement de calcaire qui fournissait la castine; la rivière
Au Lard donnait l'énergie et on se mit à exploiter activement les
savanes jusque sur Saint-Luc et Saint-Narcisse. À l'automne
1854, le haut-fourneau, crachait ses six tonnes de lave par jour.
[...] Logan, en 1863, estime que de 200 à 400 ouvriers sont
occupés suivant les saisons. On produit alors 2,000 tonnes de
fonte transformée en faux, en clous et surtout en roues pour
chemins de fer. C'est aux forges de Radnor que furent coulées
les roues des premiers wagons du chemin de fer du Nord
(Québec-Montréal) et du Pacifique Canadien." [59] [...] Les
fonderies apportaient aux travailleurs la solde rémunératrice.
[60] La population anglaise fut nombreuse à cette époque. Le
haut personnel des Forges en était composé. Les Anglais
dirigeaient aussi le commerce de la pierre de taille. Le
cadastre officiel de cet ancien village de Fermont montre que le
village comprenait environ soixante-dix terrains ou
emplacements. [...] Ce village de Fermont fut aboli le 30 mars
1939, et ses terrains retournèrent à la paroisse de Saint-Maurice
d'où il avait été détaché. [...] [61]

Référence
Soeur Lisette-Marie, Histoire de la paroisse de Saint-Maurice, s.l., s.n., 1963 : 59-61.

15 No d'identification : 24964 Fonds : Sidérurgie
  Information documentaire
(Intégral - partiel) "Large quantities of bog iron ore are found in
the district of Three Rivers, and of a remarkably excellent
quality. At the St-Maurice forges, near Three Rivers, large
quantities of iron are turned out from this source. These forges
or foundries are smelting works on a small scale, were
established by the French in 1737, and are interesting as a
monument to the enterprise of the early settlers of that region.
Nearly all the iron produced is sent to Montreal, where it is
manufactured into car wheels, though formerly castings were made
on the spot. Wrought iron is manufactured on a small scale in a
hearth finery, and used in the manufacture of axes, which have
acquired a great réputation among the lumbermen, and the demand
is far ahead of the production. At the conquest of Quebec, the
right of the French King to a royalty on the products devolved on
His Britannic Majesty. Other furnaces for this ore exist at
Radnor and L'Islet and St-Francis, Yamaska County.

Référence
Canada, Minéral Resources of the Dominion of Canada: Comprising the Provinces of ... specially adapted for Emigrants, Capitalists and Settlers, Ottawa, 1882.